You are currently browsing the Michael Kimsal’s weblog posts tagged: mpg


Car mileage update

Had a decent amount of driving again in the last couple weeks:

419.6 miles – 12.33 gallons to fill up (@ $3.929 – not over the $4 some of you are paying, but still painful!)

That’s 34.03 mpg for the last fill up.  I had some highway driving, which seems to really help kick it up past the 30-31 I typically get now.

I’ve written about this before, but it bears repeating some.  SLOW DOWN and you’ll get much better mileage.  2 summers ago I was getting 25 on average.  I now get 30 on average.  That’s a 20% improvement.

I’ve started keeping track of my mileage over at http://fuelfrog.com.  You might be able to see my mpg chart over at http://www.fuelfrog.com/users/mgkimsal/fuels/dashboard – not sure if you can see that if you’re not logged in to fuelfrog yourself.


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More MPG info – highest ever in my car

Yeah, some people probably get sick of reading about my MPG exploits.  My wife says I’m an anorak, which I don’t think is a good thing.  :)

Took a long highway trip today, and managed 34.2 mpg round trip – 280 miles all told.  The only difference I did between this and other road trips was that I stuck to 60mph (well, I hit 63 briefly going downhill once).  Keeping that constant speed below the 65 or 70 on the various sections I was on gave me about a 10% boost above my extremely good records of 31-32 earlier.  Driving slower really does boost MPG.  That 10% is the equivalent of paying $3.50/gallon vs $3.85/gallon.

FYI,  I’m driving a 2004 Chrysler Sebring (4 door, not the convertible) – Automatic, 4 cylinder.  The federal data on the car (PDF) rates it as 21-28mpg.  Driving more cautiously is getting me about a 20% fuel efficiency boost over the highest rating, and about a 30% increase over what my regular driving habits of a couple years ago were netting (23-25mpg on average, 26 in a pinch).

Try slowing down, just for a few days or even a week, and see what it does to your MPG and your wallet.


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