Recruiters’ missed opportunity

I’ve been looking in to the recruiting industry a little bit recently; specifically, the tech field.  I’m going to suspect that my observations hold true for the wider industry.

Having recently built a job application tracking system (still in early stages, but it’s working for the first level of functionality), I started looking at the emails that I get from recruiters.  Many are obvious form letters, some are a bit more handcrafted.  Many are sent via larger systems – I’m assuming prospect management systems of some sort.  I’m still trying to figure out who the players are, if any, that I can recognize in my emails – maxhire.net is the only one I’ve seen repeatedly.

I was actually more than a little surprised that none of the emails I’ve received have any sort of tracking/analytics code in them.  I’m getting full HTML emails – with extremely bloated HTML to boot, but no tracking whatsoever.  No, I take that back – the ‘opt out’ link is encoded and is tied to me somehow.  So… they know if I opt out of ever getting anything from them again, but they don’t know if I got the mail, did I open it, did I view their website because of it.  All the things you’d think they’d want to know – what subject lines work best, etc.  This seems to be totally missing from the recruiter practices that I’ve seen.  I’m not suggesting it doesn’t happen at all, but I’ve not seen it in the mails I’ve received.  You’d think that having statistics about which types of mails are more likely to be opened would be golden, but maybe not.  Maybe there’s such a ‘fire and forget’ mentality that there’s simply no real incentive?

Why is this?  It’s not that hard to do.  And, honestly, it’s never struck me that the majority of the (tech) recruiting industry is all that concerned about their long term image (I’m speaking as a whole – I know individuals who are great, but the practices of the many often tar the whole industry with a bad brush).

Thoughts?


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{ 1 comment to read ... please submit second! }

  1. I completely agree, Michael. This is actually something I’m working on implementing into my team’s approach.

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